William Joseph Knittle


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Knittle Photographs


Susan Quentine Knittle-Hunteris a member and coordinator of this surname resource center. SURNAMEWEB

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Knittle Photographs
From Marilyn Johnson McDowell (a descendant of Amanda Knittle Trout)
Marilyn McDowell: www.texas26@gmail.com
To help clarify who the people in the picture are and how Amanda Knittle Trout connects to the Knittle genealogy, I have included her line back to Joseph Knittel/Knittle.

Ancestors of Amanda Knittle Trout

Generation No. 5

Joseph (Josef) Knittel

Generation No. 4

Michael Joseph Knittel/Knittle,
Children of Michael Knittel/Knittle and Anna (Schats)(Shatzin) are:
i. Johan "Freiderich" K. Knittle,
ii. John Adam Knittel/Knittle,
iii. Michael Jr. (Knittle) Knittel,
iv. John "George" Knittle,
v. Daniel Knittle,.
vi. Cristina Knittle
vii. Catherine Rosina Knittle

Generation No .3

Daniel Sr. Knittle
He married Rebecca
Children of Daniel Sr. Knittle and Rebecca are:
i. Daniel Jr. Knittle
ii. William Jr.
iii. Phoebe Knittle
ivChild Knittle
v. Charles Knittle.
vi. Catharine Knittle
vii. vii. Monroe "Wesley" Knittle,

Generation No.2

Daniel Jr. Knittle
He married (1) Mary Ann Hiebner. He married (2) Sarah.
Children of Daniel Knittle and Mary Hiebner are:
i. Henry Knittle,. ii. Amanda Knittle, born 1842 in Pennsylvania; died 01 Apr 1893 in Maquoketa , Jackson County, Iowa, USA.
iii. Frank (Francis) Knittle
iv. Alfred Knittle,
v. Almira Knittle
vi. Mary A. Knittle
Children of Daniel Knittle and Sarah are:
i. Sevilla Knittle.
ii. William Knittle.
iii. Sallie Anna Knittle
iv. Anna Knittle.

Generation No. 1

Amanda Knittle
She married Thomas Trout
Children of Amanda Knittle and Thomas Trout are:
i. Fanny Trout.
ii. James Trout.
iii. Jason Trout.
iv. George William Trout.
v. Charles Trout.
vi. Mary E. Trout.
vii. Bert John Trout.

Amanda Knittle Trout
Amanda and Child
Amanda Knittle Trout with 4 of her children in Maquoketa, Iowa
Mary Elizabeth Trout daughter of Amanda Knittle and Thomas Trout of Maquoketa, Iowa
Grandchildren of Amanda Knittle and Thomas Trout.
Amanda Knittle Trout
Amanda and Child
Amanda Knittle Trout with 4 of her children in Maquoketa, Iowa
Mary Elizabeth Trout daughter of Amanda Knittle and Thomas Trout of Maquoketa, Iowa.
Grandchildren of Amanda Knittle and Thomas Trout.
Donna Maria and Charles Godfrey, children of Mary Elizabeth Trout.
Obituary for Amanda Knittle Trout
MAQUOKETA IOWA Excelsior News of May 1893: "The community was saddened by the death of Mrs. Thomas Trout which took place at the family residence on Pleasant Street of this city, (Maquoketa, Iowa) Saturday morning Apr. 1, 1893 at 9 AM. She was age 50. The cause of death was acute liver trouble. She had been in delicate health for several years but her condition was not considered serious until about five weeks ago when it was thought by herself and family that she might be benefited by going to Hot Springs Ark. Accordingly she set out for these famous springs stopping off at Chicago for a few days visit with her daughters one of whom Miss Fannie accompanied her to the springs. She had no sooner reached Hot Springs when she was advised by physician there to return home immediately as it was beyond there power to help her. She therefore returned to Chicago where the best medical talent procurable was obtained but she failed gradually from the first and very soon her case was pronounced hopeless and the different members of the family who were not already in the city were hastily summoned to her side. Arriving there the grief stricken family found she had rallied somewhat and hope for her ultimate recovery was kept alive within them. March 29th a special car was chartered and she was brought home in the hope that the change would prove beneficial. The trip, ill as she was, seemed to do her good and she manifested decided symptoms of improvement up to early Saturday morning or about five hours before her death when a change for the worst came. She retained consciousness to the last and realizing that the end of earth was fast approaching gave direction to her husband in regard to her burial and future of their children. At last she fell in a quiet peaceful sleep during which her spirit calmly took its flight to God who gave it."

Amanda Knittle Trout's tombstone, Mt Hope Cemetery, Maquoketa, Jackson County, Iowa.
MRS. HENRY KNITTLE SUCCUMBS TO INJURIES RECEIVED IN AUTO ACCIDENT
One of the most deplorable accidents that has happened to a Maquoketa resident for some time occured last Friday forenoon on the road on the outskirts of Dubuque, when the Dodge sedan of Miss Grace Knittle, and driven by her, overturned, resulting in injuries fatal to the aged mother of Miss Knittle, whose death occurred about four o'clock Sunday morning in a Dubuque hospital.
Miss Knittle, local manager of the Bell Telephone company, accompanied by her mother and Miss Maxine Tilton, were intent upon a pleasure ride to the Key City Friday morning and when going down the hill leading into the city proper some children ran out into the roadway directly in front of Miss Knittle's car. In effort to dodge the youngsters Miss Knittle quickly shifted her car and the light snow caused it to skid to one side and turn completely over. Miss Knittle and Miss Tilton were practically uninjured but the aged mother was badly cut about the face and body and was quickly removed to a hospital in Dubuque where every effort was made to save her life but the great shock together with the loss of blood and advanced age were more than human skill could overcome and the good mother passed away early Sunday morning.
Mrs. Knittle, whose maiden name was Maria Ingalls, was born May 19, 1846, In Goveroeur, New York, and came with her parents to Maquoketa in 1869. In 1871 she was united in marriage to Henry Knittle, a pioneer merchant of this city, who passed away in 1910, and to this union were born four children, three of whom survive, Mary and Grace of Maquoketa, and B.G. of Chicago. Dr. E.H. passed away two years ago at his home in Waterloo.
One granddaughter, Grace Haven of Iowa City, two brothers, F.B. and W.W. of this city, also survive.
Funeral services were held at the home at 1:30 this Tuesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. F.C. Worcester, of the M.E. church, with internment in Mt. Hope cemetery.
DATE OF DEATH; November 29, 1925
SOURCE: Private collection of newspaper clippings
E. H. Knittle, M.D. Born April 10, 1874
Dr. E. H. Knittle, who since 1899 has been a successful representative of the medical profession in Onslow, is now enjoying a most extensive and lucrative practice and is also the proprietor of a modern and up-to-date drug store. His birth occurred in Maquoketa, Iowa, on the 10th of April, 1874, his parents being Henry and Maria (Engalls) Knittle, who were natives of Pennsylvania and New York respectively. The father, who came to Iowa when about fourteen years of age, worked at the painter's trade for two years and then secured employment as a clerk in the store of a Mr. McGregor of Maquoketa, in which connection he became familiar with the business in principle and detail. At the end of two years he embarked in business on his own account as a merchant at Maquoketa, forming a partnership with Benjamin A. Spencer, which continued throughout the remainder of his active connection with mercantile interests. He was for many years a prominent factor in business circles and was widely recognized as one of Maquoketa's most enterprising, progressive and public-spirited citizens. It was largely owing to his efforts that the Chicago & Northwestern and Chicago, Milwaukee & St., Paul Railroads built their lines through that town, and in fact his aid and influence were ever given on the side of progress and improvement. His death, which occurred in March, 1903, when he had attained the age of sixty-two years, was deeply mourned by all who knew him, and it was uniformly conceded that the community had lost one of its most respected and influential residents. He was a charter member of the Masonic lodge in Maquoketa and a worthy exemplar of the craft.
Dr. E. H. Knittle was reared in the place of his nativity and, beginning his education at the usual age, was graduated from the Maquoketa high school with the class of 1893. Determining upon the practice of medicine as a life work, he entered the office of Dr. A. B. Bowen at Maquoketa, under whose direction he read during the periods of vacation until he had won his degree. In the fall of 1894 he entered the medical department of the Iowa State University and was graduated from that institution in 1897. He then began the practice of his chosen profession in partnership with his former preceptor, Dr. Bowen, which association was maintained for two years. On the expiration of that period, in 1899, Dr. Knittle opened an office in Onslow, Jones county, where he has since built up an extensive and altogether enviable practice. His skill and ability have been constantly manifest in the excellent results which have attended his efforts for the alleviation of human suffering and the restoration of health, and he well merits the confidence. which his patients repose in him. He keeps in touch with the onward march of the profession through his membership in the Iowa State Medical Society and the Jones County Medical Society. In the spring of 1907 he opened a handsome and well equipped. drug store at Onslow and, placing a registered pharmacist in charge, has already built up an extensive, trade in this connection.
In 1901 Dr. Knittle was united in marriage to Miss Beth Neelan, of Onslow, by whom he has a daughter, Grace Maurine. His political allegiance is given to the republican party, while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Presbyterian church, with which his wife is also identified. His fraternal relations are with Keystone Lodge, NO. 206, F.&A.M., of Wyoming; Onslow Lodge, No. 296, I.0.0.F.; Modern Woodmen Camp, NO. 2120; and the Mystic Workers of the World. While yet a young man, he has already attained a creditable position in professional circles, while the salient characteristics of his manhood are such as have brought him the warm regard of those with whom he has been otherwise associated.
From History of Jones County, Iowa, Past and Present, R. M. Corbitt, S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., Chicago, 1910, p. 133.